Joshua Cole.

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You are here: Home Dissociation

Dissociation

 

Dissociation is a common and healthy defence used in response to life-threatening danger and is associated with memory loss and a sense of disconnection from yourself or your surroundings. Many people experience mild dissociative symptoms even when there is no stress or danger e.g. daydreaming, not remembering a car journey (‘highway hypnosis’) or getting lost in a good book.

Dissociation exists on a continuum with these everyday symptoms at one end and at the other more severe symptoms such as amnesia and identity alteration. At this end dissociation is often described as ‘going away’ as the sufferer voluntarily leaves their own body. These severe symptoms usually indicate a dissociative disorder especially if they are persistent, difficult to control and affect the sufferer’s everyday life.

There are five dissociative disorders:

1. Dissociative Amnesia – this is indicated when there is an inability to recall important personal information

2. Dissociative Fugue – this refers to the situation where a sufferer finds themselves in a place with no memory of getting there and sometimes with no knowledge of who they are.

3. Depersonalisation Disorder – this is a recurrent feeling of being detached from yourself or your feelings.

4. Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) – previously known as multiple personality disorder this is characterised by the existence of two or more separate identities within one person who are able to take control.

5. Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (DDNOS) – this often precedes a diagnosis of DID and is used until a definitive diagnosis of DID is able to be made.

 

 

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You are here: Home Dissociation